Teacher Learning Video Clips

Description of video Link to Video

Use evidence of student learning to understand student thinking

 

Student task: Mr. Tamsky thinks 1/2 m is longer than 4/8 m.  I don’t agree. I think 4/8 m is longer than 1/2 m. Who do you think is correct?  Share your thinking.

 

After the research lesson, the Lesson Study team and observers discuss the data they collected on student thinking. The team asks how to connect the student conceptions to the learning goal.

 

You will find it helpful to review either the board work summarizing the lesson or video excerpts of the lesson before watching the teacher learning clip.

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See the impact of teaching materials and strategies

Teachers notice that some students created units of an arbitrary size and called it an “eighth” rather than dividing the whole in order to create accurate eighths. Teachers’ observations suggest that many students cannot explain why the two different approaches did not yield the same answer. The classroom teacher decides to begin the next day’s lesson by featuring these contrasting solution strategies and asking why the two students came to different conclusions.

 

You will find it helpful to review either the board work summarizing the lesson or video excerpts of the lesson before watching the teacher learning clip.

Watch video clip

See the impact of teaching materials and strategies

The research lesson instructor asks for ideas about a problem that arose during the lesson when errors in diagrams (different-size wholes or inaccurate “eighths”) made it hard for students to understand why two similar diagrams produced different results. The teacher was faced with a decision about how to proceed with the discussion. Colleagues relate this to the more general dilemma of how to support students to learn from mistakes without heavy-handed “teacher telling.” A colleague notes that the tension between two different answers could be an important motivator of student learning, and suggests following up on a specific student comment–“I wanted to make sure they were in the middle”–to enable students themselves to discover the difference between the two strategies.

 

 

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Consolidate and revise thinking about instruction

The teacher of the research lesson reflects on the lesson. In part 1 of the clip, he notes examples in which students connected their thinking to other students’ thinking, one of their instructional goals. He also raises two regrets: that he did not have time for students to revisit their initial solutions or to have a second class vote, to see whether students’ thinking had changed.  In part 2, the teacher mentions the sustained question-asking by a student who illustrates the accountable talk he hopes students will develop.  The teacher also shares his struggle to build the lesson summary from student comments.

Watch video clip part 1

 

Watch video clip part 2